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User McUser

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Reply with quote  #16 
You can still tell a story set in the Star Trek "universe" without using any of the trademarked or copyrighted material - Paramount only owns a very specific set of things (the movies/shows and certain phrases and words) which means anything not in that set can be freely used.

Plus in your case, since it's a comedy, you can probably claim "fair-use" on a lot of it anyways (as either "parody" or as "commentary.")

Edit: Added missing "of".
MarkBell

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Reply with quote  #17 
From the Polygon article: "That being said, Citters said CBS has no plans to go after previous fan films that violate the new guidelines, nor does it have any plans to actively chase down new fan films that just slightly violate the code. Instead, CBS will keep an eye out for mega productions, like the controversial Axanar — which started this entire debacle — and take action if need be."

From that standpoint, it really sounds like your "2 guys cracking jokes in a green screen shuttle" is exactly the kind of thing that CBS isn't planning on chasing down, even as a series of videos.  If you're not giving out physical rewards through a crowdfunding campaign or hiring veteran Star Trek actors, then you're not in the realm of affecting their bottom line.  That's really going to be the litmus test for their legal department.

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William

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Reply with quote  #18 
User McUser what did you think of the podcast interview with Mr. Citters?
User McUser

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by William
User McUser what did you think of the podcast interview with Mr. Citters?


I read the linked article that discussed the interview, but I did not listen to the interview itself. Why do you ask?
William

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Reply with quote  #20 
By listening to the podcast you're getting a opportunity to hear from the man who sets the rules. Firsthand knowledge, no speculation, no guessing. The only viewpoint that counts and you get to listen with your own ears. No one to filter the information. I highly recommend it for all who like to chime in on the subject matter. Some people have to take advanced educational classes (and pay for it)just to have educated opinions. This is free.  There were a lot of questions asked. Hopefully providing answers. 




janx

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkBell
From the Polygon article: "That being said, Citters said CBS has no plans to go after previous fan films that violate the new guidelines, nor does it have any plans to actively chase down new fan films that just slightly violate the code. Instead, CBS will keep an eye out for mega productions, like the controversial Axanar — which started this entire debacle — and take action if need be."

From that standpoint, it really sounds like your "2 guys cracking jokes in a green screen shuttle" is exactly the kind of thing that CBS isn't planning on chasing down, even as a series of videos.  If you're not giving out physical rewards through a crowdfunding campaign or hiring veteran Star Trek actors, then you're not in the realm of affecting their bottom line.  That's really going to be the litmus test for their legal department.


It's certainly not likely they'd chase it down.  But the moment you do a second video as any kind of continuation, you've broken rule #1 and could be chased down.  The nature of say YouTube is that you start a channel and keep posting content, so rule #1 gets in the way of that.

Citters didn't spend much time talking about the time limit directly (I listened to the podcast way back when it came out).  The grey area is that there's a bunch of stuff they aren't likely to chase down, but technically may violate the rules.  If one's goal is to 100% comply with the rules, the time limit one is the biggest killer.

The money rule, as Citter's said is you get $50K per 15 minutes.  Consider that STC uses about $50K per full TV-length episode, and that's plenty of money for something shorter.

Even the licensed props rule isn't a big deal.  It's only saying that if you need to buy a prop, it has to be licensed.  You can make your own tricorder.  And you can't sell the props you made.  Easy enough.


MarkBell

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Reply with quote  #22 
And the $50k only applies to crowdfunding.  
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Slate article commenting on the podcast"
Fascinatingly, Van Citters was also careful to specify that the fundraising limit specifically applies to how much can be raised in crowdfunding campaigns, not to a production’s total budget: “If you’ve got a rich Uncle Alfred who wants to throw $200,000 at you, we’re not looking at that.” (It’s worth noting that Vic Mignogna and Steven Dengler, the executive producers behind the TOS-inspired webs eries Star Trek Continues, poured more than $250,000 of their own money into the series, in addition to crowdfunding efforts.)


I think the short answer is if you strictly comply with all the rules, you're guaranteed to never hear from CBS.  If you make a series of comedic shorts (<15 minutes each) that comply with the rules in every way (especially non commercial and amateur) except for the series nature of it, you still probably won't ever hear from CBS.

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Note - this is in no way intended to be an official position of Thom or Artemis, as I am not an official representative of the creator or game.
Josphine Beecham

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Reply with quote  #23 
This is one of my favorite movies.  Star Trek
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