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bugfree

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Reply with quote  #1 

I am new to Artemis and I was wondering whether we should have people sign up on paper or on the computer?  Also, is it better to assign roles, have them random or let the participant choose?

Thanks

ogremasch

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Reply with quote  #2 
Are your players playing local? Remote? People you know, strangers, at a convention, at your house?

I like to keep things a little less formal, especially on new players. But there are times when a Captain need to make an executive decision for the good of the ship.

If you are playing local with people you know and they haven't had any experience maybe just let them sit randomly, try two 10ish min missions in their role then have everyone switch.

If you are at a convention or want a different approach I would suggest printing or have printed a set of ship's station badges (see https://www.thingiverse.com/make:605392?fbclid=IwAR0WoKl2BCGaXIRd8gRDvyqhxJP2LEToyWYJX8mHz-c3pg1yYWnhd7ploRg ) or paper slips work too, and people can draw them at random. This works well for a convention, or for indecisive players, or for players who may be afraid to pick something for fear that they are stepping on someone else's toes that may have wanted that specific spot.

I recently played on my bridge, https://m.twitch.tv/gr8alphaogre , and I played with 2 people who had played before and 3 that had not(two of which I had never met) we had a roster I printed with a rotation planned but at the end people just liked playing pretty much where they started. We played for about 3 hours.

If you are going to be at a convention where your time is limited you may want to assign people to a position ahead of time but have a backup planned if someone is either bad at that role or doesn't show up. I had 2 fighter stations on standby since I was supposed to have 7 people show up but 2 cancelled so rather than have 2 people in the fighter and the main ship be down 2 stations we just all played on the main bridge.



If you are playing with people remotely connected check out the Teamspeak. I think it is better to have people assigned to specific roles when they are remote. If you lose connection with someone you'll either need to wait for them to jump back I or assign that console to someone else. Again assignments can be made on the fly, I haven't run into a real problem with 2 people wanting to be the same role.

A recommendation that I would make is to have newer players on Comms or Science, your more experienced players at helm and weapons, and a good engineer can make a big difference, a bad engineer cant really mess you up too bad unless they are purposely trying to sabotage the ship. The captain though... the Captain needs to understand the game as well as how each station interacts with each other.
bugfree

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Reply with quote  #3 

I appreciate all of the suggestions.  The players are playing local at a convention, so people will not know each other. 


Quote:
If you are at a convention or want a different approach I would suggest printing or have printed a set of ship's station badges (see https://www.thingiverse.com/make:605392?fbclid=IwAR0WoKl2BCGaXIRd8gRDvyqhxJP2LEToyWYJX8mHz-c3pg1yYWnhd7ploRg ) or paper slips work too, and people can draw them at random. This works well for a convention, or for indecisive players, or for players who may be afraid to pick something for fear that they are stepping on someone else's toes that may have wanted that specific spot.
Thanks for all the suggestion.  It would be very easy for me to print the badges.  😃  I love that idea. 
 

Quote:
A recommendation that I would make is to have newer players on Comms or Science, your more experienced players at helm and weapons, and a good engineer can make a big difference, a bad engineer cant really mess you up too bad unless they are purposely trying to sabotage the ship. The captain though... the Captain needs to understand the game as well as how each station interacts with each other.
Great suggestions.  I have never played, but I have watched my child play. 

LawsonThompson

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Reply with quote  #4 
I'm going to assume you're talking about a convention, or at least a venue where you're hosting several missions for a large crowd.

Take a seat: I've got stories to tell! 

Here's the VERY brief recommendation: If you're dealing with an audience pool of more than 1,000, or if your event spans multiple days, I would recommend not using paper and use an online signup IF you have access to reliable Internet. Paper means that only ONE person has control of the schedule at any given moment, and no one can easily answer the question of "when's the next mission?" without being physically at the table.

That said: paper does have the advantage--like Artemis itself--that it needs no Internet connection to function!

Now... the rest of the story... 

Because we cater to first-time players, we don't assign positions until the mission time arrives and everyone hears what the positions are, and what the typical tasks are. We have this down to a 2 to 3 minute speech that quickly explains the "main buttons" of all bridge positions, then let the players discuss amongst themselves. 1 or 2 of our staff act as XO to specifically guide players with what buttons to push, and we have cheat-sheets crafted from materials gathered in the Artemis Wiki. See http://artemiswiki.pbworks.com/w/browse/#view=ViewFolder&param=Quick%20Start%20Guides

I have some edited variants of these for Artemis v2.7.1 with some adjustments to fit our touchscreen + HOTAS bridge.
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/11Sz7ZS7FrDyyPq3Z5g7bp7Z2v0Y_NbB0?usp=sharing

Our first convention was about 3,000 people, and we had literally never done this before. We had printed out a schedule grid nice and large, with 6 "slots" per mission time every 45 minutes or so. It got a bit hectic because we needed someone at the table outside the room manning the signup list pretty much all day, but it was manageable.

Then... our first Dragon Con. We used paper again, but for a 4-day convention with a massive crowd, it got really messy a few times, including accidental double-bookings, people signing up for the wrong date, and people having zero penmanship skill.

That fall, I attended a local community choir event which used BrownPaperTickets.com, a relatively inexpensive online ticketing system. We signed up, and had good results with them--but terrible WiFi--and were very skittish about using an online ticketing service again.

We bought our own pay-as-you-go Verizon hotspot, which solves the dodgy over-crowded WiFi problems in our venues, and carried on with BrownPaperTickets.com for 2 more conventions.

BrownPaperTickets does this neat little thing where they will literally mail your customers a physical printed ticket! How neat!

Know how many printed tickets we saw? Exactly ONE. Everyone else used email tickets on their smart phone.

This is because unless you already have a very eager audience, people will never sign up before the convention. So paper tickets via mail were a bust.

During a break between conventions, we attended a local escape room--and they use FareHarbor.com for event ticketing. 

It was pretty. It had single-page checkout. I was intrigued, figuring it's got to cost a small fortune, and tried to sign up to start playing with (as BrownPaperTickets.com will let you do).

Turns out that FareHarbor is NOT cheap--but you can save a lot depending on how you're taking payment:
  • Customer self-pays online via credit card: $1 fee is added to the price.
  • Customer pays in person (by visiting your table and you take their payment in the back-end system): NO fee is added.
  • Credit card fees are $0.30 USD + 1.9%.
  • Cash or personal check paid in person: no fees.
Here's what I really like...
  • Free tickets... are free.
Yes, you can use FareHarbor to sign up as many "free" tickets as you like--at no charge to you. Even your customers can sign up online and get free tickets in their email--no credit card needed.

#FareHarborFanBoy !

I'd recommend that even if you are doing a "free" event, go ahead and let FareHarbor give you their sales pitch, and set up the event for you. (Yes, they'll do that for you--free.) Totally worth it.

Oh... and assume that your venue WiFi will be terrible. BYO Hotspot or tether to the most reliable provider you can!

Just my $0.02. Plus $1 online fee. And $0.30 + 1.9% credit card transaction fee. So, what, $1.37 or something like that?

EDIT: Fixed up link to QuickStart guides and included Microsoft Publisher versions.

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ron77

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Reply with quote  #5 

At the risk of contradicting some of the previous suggestions, I'm going to offer my own experience so you may draw your conclusions from all of the suggestions presented to you.

I have been running Artemis at a local convention in Hamburg, Germany since 2014. This convention focusses heavily on tabletop roleplaying games and all things fantasy, but has made a point to include anything and everything nerdy that guests might find interesting (including but not limited to: LARP, book readings, board games, arts and crafts workshops, costume contests, discussion panels on a wide range of topics, and Artemis). We started out with one bridge and added another bridge every year until we capped out at 4 bridges due to space limitations at the convention. For the most part, we don't run missions. We run multiplayer scenarios (usually Double Front, Siege, or Border War) for a total of 2 hours per cycle for nearly 48 hours straight. The idea, at least for us, has always been to introduce guests to this game and to offer a chance to play to veterans. Also, we don't charge a dime.

Because of this format, we offer a chance to sign up on location. We print out sign-up forms, one form per ship. Players can gather their own crew and sign up as a full crew or just fill those positions they want and leave the rest out for other players to fill. It's all very low-key with next to no threshold that might put off people who don't really feel like they know what they're committing to. Signing up online and in advance wouldn't really work for us because we can easily fill 4 bridges (and then some) per cycle and still have a waiting list filled with people who haven't played yet.

My suggestions are as follows:
In my opinion there are two general types of games that you could run at a convention:

  1. Introduction games so newcomers can "take her out for a spin". This type of game usually requires some personnel to teach the controls and help people figuring out what it is they need to do (we found that one proficient veteran per bridge works fine, more than 2-3 actively engaged instructors slow things down significantly). In a 2-hour slot you can teach people the ropes and get one or two decent scenarios in without giving people the feeling that this is running too long.
  2. Immersive games are generally aimed at veteran players and offer immersion rather than instruction. Most of the time they follow a mission and/or story arc and require much more preparation to set up.
Be aware that introduction games can work for veteran players but newcomers might be totally lost in your immersive game because you're not offering an introduction; and depending on how proficient the players need to be, escpecially if the proverbial poo hits the fan early on in the immersive game, this might quickly turn into a clusterscrew for everyone. So, knowing your audience is key. Having a solid idea of what it is you want to do and what you're expecting is half the preparation, IMHO.

That said, introduction games work well without advance sign-up while for your immersive game you might want to make sure you fill your ranks early.
Mike Substelny

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Reply with quote  #6 
I recommend that you have a crew of at least two volunteers on hand at all times.

Post a sign that you are not a baby sitting service - children must be accompanied by an adult at all times. If you don't don't do this some parents will gladly fill your bridge with their children while they go off to spend a childless day enjoying the convention.

At least one of your volunteers should be a woman at all times. We have observed that women love to play Artemis but they may be reluctant to enter an all-male bridge. As long as you have a female volunteer you will find the bridge much more busy and inviting.

We always bring our own wired network to any convention. Nothing brings a hotel's wi-fi to its knees like a science fiction convention where every nerd is carrying a phone, a tablet, and other tech devices at all times.

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Sandman

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Reply with quote  #7 
Slightly off-topic but, @LawsonThompson: Are you willing to share your revised cheat sheets? Either directly or post to the forums? Understandable if you decline, but it doesn't hurt to ask.
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bugfree

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Reply with quote  #8 
I would also be very interested in the cheat sheets.
ogremasch

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Reply with quote  #9 
These may need some updating but I thought that these posts would be good references for anyone looking at hotkeys or cheatsheets.

https://artemis.forumchitchat.com/file?id=1662821

https://artemis.forumchitchat.com/post/station-guides-7272840?&trail=15

https://artemis.forumchitchat.com/post/keyboard-skin-consoles-6731856?highlight=overlay&pid=1281456404
LawsonThompson

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandman
Slightly off-topic but, @LawsonThompson: Are you willing to share your revised cheat sheets? Either directly or post to the forums? Understandable if you decline, but it doesn't hurt to ask.


No problem: meant to post this a few days ago but got distracted.

Google Drive folder here with QuickStart Guides in PDF and Microsoft Publisher format, including some assets: 
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0ByJesK_65KHTVUY1U0NzWXhFbVE


The 2018 folder contains the latest versions, and you may find the fonts and images folders useful if you want to continue to make edits.


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Sandman

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Reply with quote  #11 
Thanks all! Glad to have these!
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Gypsyjuggler

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Reply with quote  #12 
https://artemis.forumchitchat.com/file?id=1662821

I love these cheat sheets. I printed them out on heavy card stock and scored them on the sides so they sit up when you are at your station. The group I introduced the game to loved them and it made everything so much easier. Just gotta do one for fighters and I'll be all set. Actually the first time I went out to Critical Hit games to play I brought them with me and it surprised Thom. I don't think he remembered they were on the forum. I think he like them.

Patrick Thompson
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davidtrinh

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugfree

I am new to Artemis and I was wondering whether we should have people sign up on paper or on the computer?  Also, is it better to assign roles, have them random or let the participant choose?

Thanks



That's a great idea to get organized before approaching the computers. Some even have members draw a position out of a hat before they take a seat.

I host at conventions, in real life and online. When things would appear chaotic, I turn to my trusty Bridge Crew Assignment application which I wrote. It's a bit of a high tech approach to address and treat the operational challenges I observed.

Works on mobile devices and web browser. It provides members a briefing package, assigns roles and for conventions, collects email addresses for a local mailing list to setup future game sessions.

A Artemis fan even made a training video on how to use it.



Web application: deploy.tsn-artemis.ca

Here's the original article when I started on this little project.
https://artemis.forumchitchat.com/post/mission-and-bridge-assignments-a-administrative-approach-9881215

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