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power2084

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Hello !

We're looking forward to have an Artemis bridge at our next video games convention.

I'm rather new to Artemis and I don't know a lot about networks. Assume internet won't be
available where the bridge will be setup and I'd like to establish a *wired* network, without any router.

So how do I go with this ?  [confused]

I'm wondering if I could just buy a HUB to connect all our laptops ?

(like this one: http://www.amazon.com/TP-LINK-Gigabit-Ethernet-Desktop-TL-SG108/dp/B00A121WN6/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1460785948&sr=8-13&keywords=hub)

Thank you for your replies, and any additional help you can give me   [smile]
Lightning3840

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The short answer to your question is yes, you can just get a hub and ethernet cables of adequate length and connect all the laptops through the hub. The set-up for actually connecting the laptops in the network varies with the OS of the laptops. Your server will need to set-up a static IP address for the others to connect to and as memory serves there are some settings for your clients to connect as well. Admittedly and unfortunately, I've only done this once before in the last year so the nitty-gritty of it escapes me, but I can confidently tell you that it can work.
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power2084

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Excellent !  Thank you for your reply.

I was wondering, which would be required for Artemis, a switch or a hub ?
Would one not work ?


ryleyra

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I believe you would need a network switch, not a hub. Most switches are called hubs nowadays, though, so watch out when you are buying one. The difference is that a switch will assign each port an IP address, such as 192.168.0.104 through 192.168.0.103. A network hub doesn't assign addresses, so assuming its just connecting your laptops together, they would all be on 128.0.0.1. (localhost)

There isn't really anything wrong with this, as long as you have only one server. All your clients will connect to the server on localhost, and be distinct from each other. The same would happen if you ran them all on the same computer. However, you can't run more than one server that way.

A switch is better, because not only are all the clients and the server on different IP addresses, but you can also connect to the Internet and connect to a game somewhere else. And course you can isolate two servers on their own IP address and let them run their own individual games, which you can't with hubs unless you buy two of them.

Note the Artemis server will tell you what IP address it is on, whether localhost or 192.168.0.101.
power2084

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Aaaah, ok it makes sense !

One last question though, should I get a switch where the computers (mostly laptops) will connect using an Ethernet cable (also called RJ45 cable or CAT6/CAT7 cable) or one where computers will connect thru USB ?
Nighthawk

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Reply with quote  #6 
always favor ethernet over any other connection.
I would use a router instead of a switch, but that's my preference.
even though it is plug-and-play, do set up your connections manually.
if you can't personally tinker with every user's computer, at least make up a document detailing how to connect to the network.... if the users know their computers, they will connect correctly even on different systems.

(usb switch? like, for TCP/IP? never heard of it... 0รด)
GabrialGF

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I run Artemis at plenty of cons and I work in IT. I feel like the answers here are correct even if their reasoning is a little off.

Setting up Artemis in an isolated LAN environment is super simple. By isolated LAN environment I mean that all the computers are connected locally and that there are no none-Artemis computers on the network. Let me go into a little more detail on what is required and how I recommend doing it.

ethernet vs USB

Artemis will only run over Ethernet. USB is to have devices talk to the computer. It is not used for networking as it is slow, has limited range, and is fairly expensive. So you want to use Ethernet. Ethernet will always have a RJ-45 connector so no need to worry there. If you are looking to future proof your setup I would recommend going with Cat6 cables as they are the current standard and are only slightly more expensive than the older Cat5e standard. But both will work with Artemis.

Hub vs Switch vs Router

Hubs are the cheaper option though you will be hard pressed to find one as they have been replaced by switches now a days. The difference between a hub and a switch is that when a hub receives a piece of information (called a packet) it will send it to everyone that is connected to it. A switch will take the packet and only send it out the port that the packet needs to go. A router (for the purpose of this discussion) is an advanced switch. Routers are the most expensive but they have some added features that are great for large setups (multiple bridges). I personally use a switch for my setups even when running multiple bridges.

Speed of devices.

Just to head this off at the pass. All modern equipment will run at 100mb/s speed. Cat5e will do what is called gigabit or 1000mb/s cat6 is rated for 10 gigabit or 10000mb/s. Artemis realistically only needs 10mb/s to run properly. (Yes I have run it at that speed to and it can probably run at even slower speeds) price point for a 100mb/s switch is going to be about $50 for a 8-12 port switch. A gigabit switch will run you $150-300 depending what you looking for. A 10 gigabit switch will be $500 or more.

Setup:

Once again I am assuming this is an isolated network. I would set the IP address of the server to 10.1.1.1 then set your other machines to 10.1.1.2-6. You will need to set your subnet mask to 255.255.255.0 and you can leave the gateway blank.

If you have any questions please don't hesitate to reach out to me. You can PM me or just respond to this post.
power2084

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Thanks Gabrial for this detailed reply ! Very appreciated  [thumb]

I will continue our discussion here on the forums, since it can serve more than me  [smile]


Here is my next concern:

First, here's a bit of information on how we are planning the organization of the event. As I said before, this will be at a video gaming convention called Warpzone 9 (the 9th edition of the Warpzone) and where I live, most likely less than 5% of the attendees have heard of Artemis. We expect around 1000 players. If things go well like past editions, we also expect 50 to 70 volunteers who help to make the event a success.

What we'll do specifically to get computers for Artemis is that we will ask volunteers to sign up to bring their computers (laptops preferred) to the convention. Several weeks before the event, we'll do a couple of test runs (first with 3 computers, then with 6).

I've already located one volunteer willing to bring her laptop (yesterday, in fact), however I asked her to check if her laptop has an Ethernet (RJ45) plug and she said no ? [confused]  

I described the plug well but apparently, she connects to internet only by Wifi, which seems to be why she doesn't have that plug.

So I was wondering, what percentage of laptops have (or don't have) an Ethernet port ? Could this become a major issue with organizing our bridge ?

GabrialGF

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Most laptops have an Ethernet port. But not all. It's usually hidden behind a door or a panel especially on HP laptops. If it's a really small or thin laptop it might not have one. You could do it all wirelessly but you might have issues if the wireless cards on the PCs or the router have issues. If you are planning on using laptops, I'd make sure that you have mice for them.
Mike Substelny

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Reply with quote  #10 
Wireless doesn't work very well for the server but it is generally fine for the clients. If you use a WiFi switch try to connect your server via Cat5 or Cat6.
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power2084

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Good info. Thanks !

If you think of any other useful info, add another reply  [biggrin] 
GabrialGF

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It's been my experience that you want a bridge for about every 300 attendees. That's when your signup a peak and you start getting queues and people wishing they could play but the lines are too long. Have you decided on a format?
power2084

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Well here's what I have decided so far: there will be a signup booth with a whiteboard behind, where bridges that are so far organized will be displayed, as well as with the time they're supposed to start playing.

Games will be 25 mins. long, with a 1-2 mins introduction of the Crew (with the captain last !) by a hired local personality. This should allow a new bridge (and game) every 30 mins.


The signup booth will also allow smaller groups to merge with others to form a full bridge.

Once a bridge has signed up, they will go to a small room where 2-3 bridges will be briefed on how the game plays (that will be a 30 mins. class). They will also decide who plays what role and write it down on an introduction card, which will then be given to the announcer.

So far so good ?
LawsonThompson

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by power2084

I described the plug well but apparently, she connects to internet only by Wifi, which seems to be why she doesn't have that plug.


So I was wondering, what percentage of laptops have (or don't have) an Ethernet port ? Could this become a major issue with organizing our bridge ?



Many new ultrabooks are so thin there's almost no room for Ethernet jacks. You might find that older laptops (Dell Latitude D8xx and E6xxx) more likely have Ethernet.

USB Ethernet adapters are about $20, like this one, and are quite sufficient for Artemis.

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power2084

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Reply with quote  #15 
I suppose you're talking about something like this ?

https://www.amazon.ca/Cable-Matters-Ethernet-Adapter-Black/dp/B00ET4KHJ2?ie=UTF8&gclid=CMj6la2PpMwCFUpZhgodAJMLMw&redirect=true

  • Portable USB to Ethernet adapter connects a USB 2.0 equipped computer or tablet to a router, modem, or network switch to bring Fast Ethernet to your network connection
  • Leveraging the high bandwidth of Hi-Speed USB 2.0 interface at up to 480 Mbps, this USB 2.0 to Ethernet adapter guarantees a reliable network connection with 100 Mbps Ethernet
  • This lightweight USB to network adapter is a perfect accessory for adding a standard RJ45 port to your Ultrabook, notebook, or Macbook Air for file transferring, video conferencing, gaming, and HD video streaming
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