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AlC

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Reply with quote  #1 
Howdy folks!

Quick Introduction: I'm a HS English Teacher. I discovered Artemis last year and Love it! I have purchased a license to use for my Science Fiction Literature class. We will be using it soon, but my students have never seen a star trek episode! Horror, I know.

Here is my question: If I was to show one episode of star trek that best represents Artemis, which episode should it be? 

I was thinking Corbomite Maneuver, but feel there may be a better one. 

Thanks for any input!

al
ogremasch

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Reply with quote  #2 
The trouble with tibbles

The Devil in the dark, this one might be the best to show as a one off but it doesnt really give a good controls usage.

Balance of Terror

The Doomsday machine might just be the best that I can think of for controls.
AlC

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ogremasch
The trouble with tibbles

The Devil in the dark, this one might be the best to show as a one off but it doesnt really give a good controls usage.

Balance of Terror

The Doomsday machine might just be the best that I can think of for controls.


Thank you! Balance of Terror is a good one.. I'm gonna compare it to doomsday machine and decide between those two. Thank you!

al
Mike Substelny

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As I recall, when Thom was originally building Artemis he had "The Balance of Terror" and "The Ultimate Computer" playing in the background over and over.

I personally would select "The Doomsday Machine" as the best introduction to Star Trek - it has the fabulous writing of Norman Spinrad, the impeccable directing of Mark Daniels, one of Trek's best guest star performances from William Windom, and kick-ass original music by Sol Kaplan. It also depicts damage control teams repairing a broken ship system by system. "The Doomsday Machine" only has one female character, Lt. Palmer, but she is shown as a competent professional Starfleet officer and not eye candy or a main squeeze.

"Balance of Terror" is a decent introduction to Artemis. It quite literally depicts the Enterprise defending the outposts in a sector against enemy attack and was Thom's inspiration for the solo missions in Artemis. Unfortunately it does not distinguish the weapons very well, using the word phaser for weapons that are clearly torpedoes.  On the plus side, "Balance of Terror" has three ongoing female characters (Uhura, Janice Rand, and Angela Martine) with important speaking roles. Unfortunately the Kirk/Rand relationship is pretty cringeworthy in this episode, snatched right out of a 1930s pulp magazine. Rand is clearly there to give Kirk a main squeeze, and thus a terrible example of how women were depicted in most of the Star Trek universe. If you have any young women in your class you should not show this episode until you've had a conversation bracing them for American television in the 1960s.

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Mike Substelny

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Also, this conversation probably belongs under the "Off Topic" forum and I intend to move it there tomorrow after you've had a chance to catch up.
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ryleyra

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I always felt Rand was a somewhat unique case. She was clearly meant to be the "Captain's Woman", and it didn't help that she was consistently portrayed as being in love with Kirk no matter how to script varied in whether it was one sided or not. That they really didn't know what to do with her sadly led to Grace Lee Whitney leaving the show.

Of course, none of the women were really given major roles, but that Uhura and others could show that they were competent officers (and not just biding their time until they could get married and have children, which was a recurring refrain) was pretty subversive for the time.
Mike Substelny

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryleyra
I always felt Rand was a somewhat unique case. She was clearly meant to be the "Captain's Woman", and it didn't help that she was consistently portrayed as being in love with Kirk no matter how to script varied in whether it was one sided or not. That they really didn't know what to do with her sadly led to Grace Lee Whitney leaving the show.

Of course, none of the women were really given major roles, but that Uhura and others could show that they were competent officers (and not just biding their time until they could get married and have children, which was a recurring refrain) was pretty subversive for the time.


I agree that Rand was a unique case. In the 1964 screenplay for "The Cage" the Captain's Yeoman was J.M. Colt and it seems Yeoman Janice Rand was simply rolled over when the series was updated. The Rand/Kirk relationship was the same sort of platonic sexual tension as Perry Mason/Della Street had in the 1930s Perry Mason novels.

IMO by the late '60s that type of relationship didn't really work anymore. By 1967 everyone would assume that Perry was sleeping with Della, Kirk was sleeping with Rand, and Tony Nelson was sleeping with Jeannie. That's why Tony and Jeannie had to get married in 1968. But a Kirk/Rand marriage would break Star Trek, so Rand had to go.

I liked Rand, she had a few good episodes, but that character and relationship were better suited to a bygone era. Every subsequent Star Trek show had much more modern male/female relationships.

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AlC

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Thank you for the Feedback everyone! I Ended up showing Balance of Terror to a my class and they were really enthralled with it..

Today we Broke into two teams and each team learned the functions and controls. The students had a lot of fun. There wasn't a lot of discipline as the Captains didn;t really know what was going on and hte other roles kind of did their own thing.

Tomorrow We ramp up the difficulty and focus on following the Captain's orders and working as a team...

Friday the two teams will assault each other... It will be a good for these students to work together. 

Thanks again everyone.

ryleyra

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Substelny

I agree that Rand was a unique case. In the 1964 screenplay for "The Cage" the Captain's Yeoman was J.M. Colt and it seems Yeoman Janice Rand was simply rolled over when the series was updated. The Rand/Kirk relationship was the same sort of platonic sexual tension as Perry Mason/Della Street had in the 1930s Perry Mason novels.


Ironically, I LIKE that kind of relationship. In one of my original stories the main character and his AI assistant/bodyguard have that kind of relationship. It helps that she's not physical, so the flirting is a sort of game to them. It was very much inspired by Mike Hammer and Velda, so clearly it goes with the genre.

Getting off topic though, even for Off Topic. Sorry about that.

ron77

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlC
There wasn't a lot of discipline as the Captains didn;t really know what was going on and hte other roles kind of did their own thing.


In my experience, captains tend to enjoy the game more if they don't feel like they were thrown into the deep end. Which is usually the case if you make a captain lead a team of people without even a sliver of an idea as to what the ship (and game) can and cannot do. It might help if you captained for a bit while everyone else learned the controls during play, the future captain included.

Alternatively, be a helping hand and give suggestions to the captain. If you address them with "Captain, sir" it might also offset the fact that they are the only ones requiring constant help from the teacher.
ryleyra

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ron77

Alternatively, be a helping hand and give suggestions to the captain. If you address them with "Captain, sir" it might also offset the fact that they are the only ones requiring constant help from the teacher.


An experienced First Officer might be a good role for a host wanting to help the players learn the game. That way the Captain gets to be an active role on the team, and the First Officer can provide hints and information without actually filling a crew slot. And it wouldn't be unusual for a First Officer to offer advice, particularly to a "green" Captain.

Mike Substelny

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Reply with quote  #12 
I hope things are going well, AIC. Please keep us up to date when you can.

I would love to know the reading list for your class.

You didn't ask for suggestions and it would be rude and presumptuous to offer them. But if your class reads short stories I hope one of them is Eric Frank Russell's Allamagoosa. It's a lighthearted tale about a very Artemis-like starship crew and it was the first short story to win a Hugo Award way back in 1955.

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